SarahCahill_1_byMarianneLaRochelle

Happy Birthday Lou Harrison! featuring Sarah Cahill and Varied Trio

In a co-presentation with MicroFest, T@MS presents San Francisco pianist Sarah Cahill and LA’s own Varied Trio (Aron Kallay, Shalini Vijayan, and Yuri Inoo) in a celebration of Lou Harrison’s life and music in honor of his centennial year. 

Program

1st Concerto for Violin and Percussion
Yuri Inoo-percussion, Shalini Vijayan-violin

Jig, Range-Song, Dance for Lisa Karon
Sarah Cahill-piano

Varied Trio
Yuri Inoo-percussion, Shalini Vijayan-violin, Aron Kallay-piano
Conductus from Suite
Sarah Cahill-piano

Omnipotent Chair
Yuri Inoo & Aron Kallay-percussion, Shalini Vijayan-violin

Summerfield Set
Sarah Cahill-piano

DSC_0031Artist Interviews: Sarah Cahill

You’ll be performing several solo piano works by Lou Harrison at Monk Space, including Jig, Range-Song, Dance for Lisa Karon, Conductus from Suite, and Summerfield Set. Can you tell us bit about these works? Also, what are your thoughts about Lou Harrison’s music in general? Even though Lou Harrison said "Equal temperament destroys everything," and was far more fascinated by just intonation and other tunings, he wrote some extraordinary music for the equal tempered piano (which describes basically all modern pianos).  His Jig and Range-Song have been played only rarely, if at all, since he wrote them in 1939.  He was 22 years old, studying with Henry Cowell, who was in San Quentin at the time.  In these pieces, he evokes Cowell with his chord cluster techniques.  There's a third piece from this set called Reel, and it's sometimes called Reel for Henry Cowell.  That gets played a lot, as opposed to Jig and Range-Song.  Dance for Lisa Karon is a year earlier, from 1938, and the manuscript was discovered just a few years ago in someone's house in San Francisco.  Conductus is from the Suite which Lou Harrison wrote when he was studying with Arnold Schoenberg, and it resembles Schoenberg's own Suite in that it uses a twelve-tone row but is not strictly twelve-tone.  Summerfield Set is an exuberant three-movement work from 1988, and it's the Lou Harrison we know and love, with dance rhythms and singable tunes.  It's dedicated to the keyboardist Susan Summerfield.

What do you find most compelling about commissioning and performing new works? I love the surprise of receiving a new score, of bringing a piece of music to life and knowing it's going to enter the repertoire and be interpreted by countless other pianists (after I have lots of time with it!).  It's exciting to explore a piece of music that's completely unknown territory.  And I love working with living composers, the exchange of ideas, the whole process of developing a piece and working towards a premiere or a recording.

What initially drew you to the piano, and what are your favorite (and/or least favorite) aspects about being a pianist? I was initially drawn to the piano by a charismatic and beautiful teacher named Sharon Mann who is a Bach specialist.  Because of her, playing Bach was everything to me.  My least favorite aspect of being a pianist is the pressure of trying to learn a piece fast when ideally it should be given a year or two.  My favorite part of being a pianist is immersing myself in practising all day long, which is a luxury, and that feeling in performance that someone else is playing and I'm just listening-- when the music seems to play itself.  One other thing I find exciting is getting to the point where I know a composer's work so well that I can identify mistakes in the score.

Do you ever compose? If not, what kind of composer do you think you would be? I would be a terrible composer.  I love the whole process of interpreting.

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