This Season At Tuesdays @ Monk Space

Flotsam & Jetsam

Melodicas, harmonicas, Chinese paper accordions, triangles, antique cymbals, amplified blackboards, counter bells, credit cards, and roaming clarinetists. Flotsam & Jetsam is a concert I’ve been wanting to put together for many years. It’s a selection of pieces I’ve heard in person or online that have grabbed my attention and roused my imagination but I could never quite fit on any program. Here, completely unrelated works snap together like pieces of a puzzle! Members of Brightwork join forces with pianist Genevieve Lee, Lyris Quartet violinist Shalini Vijayan, the Now Hear Ensemble, and our very own T@MS team-members to bring this unique one-of-a-kind program to life. -Aron Kallay


New Virtuosity: EMERGING ARTSTS SERIES with pianist Mari Kawamura

"Piano virtuosity" often calls to mind fast and flamboyant technical passages like those in Liszt’s Transcendental Etudes or pianists crashing through Rachmaninoff’s piano concerti playing fists full of notes. However, pianists of the 20th and 21st centuries have contended with the fact that "virtuosity" now demands an ever-expanding technique that includes inside the piano preparations, finding harmonics directly on the strings, and even speaking or singing while playing! The piano has always been valued for its tremendous expressive capabilities, inspiring composers and performers to explore the piano in exciting and challenging ways. As this practice has developed, so have notions about what constitutes a "good recital" of new classical music.

New Virtuosity juxtaposes the historical with the contemporary, exploring the very nature of modern performance practice on the "King of Instruments." The program features Francois Couperin’s orde 18ème de clavecin in F major alongside three newly commissioned works. The Couperin was one of the first pieces to demand the sort of precision, dexterity, and stamina that have become iconic aspects of keyboard virtuosity. The commissioned works by Joseph Bourdeau, Annie Hui-Hsin, and Anthony Vine incorporate new and novel approaches to virtuosity using a variety of techniques, from electronics and theatrical elements to delicate inside-the-piano manipulations. Join us to take a kaleidoscopic journey through the nearly symphonic worlds that only the piano can create.


Midterms: This will hurt someone

Well… it’s that time again. Time to choose between the lesser of two evils, mostly. In this uber divisive time, let’s all come together to enjoy an evening of mostly politically inspired music curated by myself, Ian Dicke, and Thomas Kotcheff. All are welcome no matter your political views, just leave your signs in your yard where they belong. -Aron Kallay


Grinding Sounds, Repeating Patterns, and Sonorous Incantations

Monk Space is an amazing place to take in a concert. It’s both intimate and welcoming, and the conversations before and after the show are often as inspiring as the music. I’ve found that one of the secrets of programing this series is to really understand the acoustics inside our brick-lined warehouse. Not every hall is good for every combination of instruments and in many ways Monk Space takes this to the extreme. Two things the space absolutely loves are low strings, and voice. Come hear bassist Scott Worthington and the Hex vocal sextet bathe Monk Space in luminous sonorities. –Aron Kallay


PartchSongs

PartchSongs is an intimate evening of vocal music by one of American music’s most fascinating  mavericks. From the very beginning, Harry Partch was convinced that musical instruments should be designed to mimic the human voice—with all of its glides and expressive articulation—rather than the other way around. To that end, he created his own scale of at least 43 notes per octave and an orchestra of instruments to perform them.

The Grammy winning ensemble PARTCH will perform the composer’s settings of ancient Chinese poetry [Li Po], Lewis Carroll [Alice in Wonderland], Thomas Wolfe, as well as hobo letters and hitchhiker graffiti, all accompanied on Adapted Viola, Adapted Guitars, Chromelodeon, Kithara, Bass & Diamond Marimbas, and Spoils of War. AND – as a Monk Space exclusive, there will be a demonstration of the instruments before the show, so plan to get there early! (Yes, there will be an instrument petting zoo afterwards….But remember: don’t feed the animals!) -John Schneider


say I am not far enough

Synchromy and Tuesdays @ Monkspace present “say I am not far enough”, a night of readings, art, and music inspired by the life and work of late American novelist Ursula K. Le Guin. Born in Berkeley, California in 1929, Le Guin’s unique voice broke barriers in the realms of science fiction and fantasy in the 1960s and 70s, lending a feminist slant and refreshing approach to genres dominated by macho male protagonists and space battles. In celebration of her pioneering spirit and dazzling storytelling abilities, the program will feature musical offerings inspired by Le Guin and her writings, including Elinor Armer’s “Lockerbones/Airbones”, Joseph Schwantner’s “Wild Angels of the Open Hills”, and Jason Barabba’s “say I am not far enough”. The evening will also include readings and discussions of some of Le Guin’s more well-known novels and short stories.


Eric Byers | Cello: my heart comes undone…

‘My heart comes undone’ is an evening of music for solo cello. The first half features the earliest known piece for solo cello which serves as inspiration for works by Esa-Pekka Salonen and Kaija Saariaho as well as Penderecki’s Suite for solo cello. The second half features a younger generation of composers who’s works with electronics are entirely new but also have a strong link to the past. -Eric Byers


MicroFest Records Release Party!

Come out and celebrate five years of MicroFest Records. The concert will feature selections from the catalogue. The first half, featuring solos and small chamber works, will take place in Monk Space’s Studio B. The concert will move to Studio A for the second half, and will feature the Harvey Mudd American Gamelan!


 

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